COVID-19 Exposure Scenarios and Guidance for Students and Employees

Revised January 14, 2022.

The following guidance is for University of Oregon students and employees (faculty, officers of administration, classified staff, student employees), and other affiliated individuals who are accessing university property.

The UO is following current Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidance for isolation and quarantine and consults regularly with Lane County Public Health. Visit the CDC guidance for information including

  • What to do if you develop symptoms or test positive for COVID-19.
  • How long to quarantine or isolate.
  • What to do after quarantine or isolation.
  • Additional precautions to take.

UO students and employees can use this guide for help determining quarantine and isolation scenarios.

UO Isolation and Quarantine Flowchart

Additional information specific to UO students and employees can be found below:

 
UO Students UO Employees

If you need to miss class for COVID-related reasons, notify your instructors so you can make up missed class work. 

If you need to miss work for COVID-related reasons, notify your supervisor.  

If you test positive through a home test complete the Lane County home-test form

You do not need to complete the case form if you test positive through MAP, UHS, or a testing facility in Lane County.

If you test positive, complete the Employee case form.  

 

If an employee is asked to quarantine or isolate at home and if the university previously authorized the employee to work remotely, then the employee may continue to work from home while in quarantine or isolation. The university also might authorize work-from-home if none is currently in place but work-from-home is appropriate for the work being performed. 

See below the table for definitions and clarifications of key terms and where to direct questions.

The CDC has provided new definitions for vaccination status:

Vaccination status Definition
Up to date
  • Boosted, or
  • Completed the primary series of Pfizer or Moderna within the last six months, or
  • Completed the primary dose of Johnson and Johnson/Janssen (J&J) within the last two months.
Not up to date
  • Unvaccinated, or
  • Has not completed the primary series of any COVID-19 vaccine, or
  • Completed the primary series of Pfizer or Moderna over six months ago and is not boosted, or
  • Completed the primary dose of J&J over two months ago and is not boosted.
 

Questions:

Definitions and Clarifications:

Case — A “confirmed positive” or “confirmed case” is defined by meeting confirmatory laboratory evidence for COVID-19.

Close contact — A “close contact” is defined as any individual who was within 6 feet of an infected person for a cumulative total of 15 minutes or more over a 24-hour period during the infected person’s period of transmissibility. In cases where a local public health department is involved, the university will defer to the local public health department in their determination about whether someone is a close contact and when the quarantine period ends.

Isolate — To “isolate” is to separate an individual who tests positive for COVID-19 from others in order to slow the spread of the disease. I

Fully vaccinated — A person is “fully vaccinated” two weeks after they have received recommended primary doses of a COVID-19 vaccine (this varies by manufacturer). This does not consider boosters.

Local public health department — The term “local public health department” refers to the health department of the affected person’s county of residence.

Period of transmissibility — The "period of transmissibility" is the time frame an infected person can spread COVID-19 starting from two days before they have any symptoms (or, for an asymptomatic person, two days prior to positive sample collection date (test date)) until they meet criteria for ending isolation.

Presumptive positive — A “presumptive positive” or “presumptive case” describes a person who, without a positive diagnostic test, is deemed positive for COVID-19 by a health care provider or public health department as a result of having COVID-like symptoms and having been in close contact with a confirmed case.

Quarantine — To “quarantine” is to separate an individual who has been exposed to COVID-19 from any other individuals, including others who have also been exposed. The purpose is to slow the spread of the disease by separating and restricting the movement of individuals who were exposed to minimize the exposure of others and to monitor if they become sick. Individuals who are up to date on their COVID-19 vaccines do not need to quarantine if they have been a close contact unless they develop COVID-19 symptoms.

Symptomatic — A person who has any of the following symptoms associated with COVID-19, when they are different from one’s baseline, is considered "symptomatic": Fever or chills, cough, fatigue, muscle or body aches, headache, new loss of taste or smell, sore throat, congestion or runny nose, nausea or vomiting, diarrhea, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing.

Vaccination status: Not up to date - A person is "not up to date" if they are unvaccinated, have not completed the primary series of any COVID-19 vaccine, have completed the primary series of Pfizer more than five months ago and is not boosted, of Moderna over six months ago and is not boosted, or have completed the primary series of J&J over two months ago and is not boosted.

Vaccination status: Up to date - A person is "up to date" if they are boosted, have completed the primary series of Pfizer within the last five months, or Moderna within the last six months, or completed the primary does of J&J within the last two months.